Some useless trivia

 

 

George Washington was not the first president … 2004-01-05

 

Remember there were the Articles of Confederation ...

 

          http://www.marshallhall.org/hanson.html

 

 

 

Fedex logo

 

I never knew this, but if you saw 60 minutes last nite, there is a 'hidden' arrow in the logo.



More useless trivia … 2004-01-07

 

Regarding our discussions today:

 

Conversion from Julian to Gregorian Calendar.    Actually Ranko and I were both partly right.    The conversion took place at different times in different countries between the 16th and 18th centuries:


          http://www.hermetic.ch/cal_stud/cal_art.htm#Adoption

 

Wind Chill Factor:

 

          http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/windchill/index.shtml

          http://www.weatherimages.org/data/windchill.html

 

Degree days:

 

          http://www.castlebridge.com/ddd.html



Full 'Wolf' Moon - today's trivia

 

http://www.space.com/spacewatch/full_moon_names_040102-1.html#jan

 

Wolf Moon

 

Luna's Crazy Names: Full 'Wolf' Moon on January 7

By Joe Rao

SPACE.com's Night Sky Columnist

posted: 07:00 am ET

02 January 2004

 

Amid the zero cold and deep snows of midwinter, the wolf packs howled hungrily outside Indian villages. It was also known as the Old Moon or the Moon After Yule. In some tribes this was the Full Snow Moon; most applied that name to the next moon.

 

You can call it just a Full Moon, but throughout human history the ever-changing face of Earth's satellite has been viewed more creatively. Luna's names -- different each month -- derive from many cultures.

 

Many Full Moon names used in North America date back to Native Americans, of what is now the northern and eastern United States. Those tribes of a few hundred years ago kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full Moon. Their names were applied to the entire month in which each occurred.

 

To be sure, there were some variations in the Moon names, but in general the same ones were current throughout the Algonquin tribes from New England on west to Lake Superior. European settlers followed their own customs and created some of their own names.

 

Since the lunar ("synodic") month is roughly 29.5 days in length on average, the dates of the full Moon shift from year to year. Here is a listing of all the Full Moon names, as well as the dates and times (for the Eastern time zone) for the next twelve months.

 

More useful information - Cool Lunar Cycle Facts

 

http://www.space.com/spacewatch/full_moon_names_040102-1.html#jan

In our Gregorian Calendar, 372 years provides an excellent long period cycle for the recurrence of a particular phase on a given date. Thus, we know with absolute certainty that the same Full Moon that shines down on us on June 3 of 2004 will also be shining on June 3 in the year 2376.

(that also might be indicative of SMDB needing to reuse internal numbers by 2376)

 

Bronx county border

 

          Redirection of harlem ship canal portion of Bronx stays in new york county

 

Tensile strength of box trivia --- Cobb factor

 

http://www.fcbm.org/activities/tests_for_corr_media.htm
Now here is the certification you can find on some boxes giving you the ratings, such as crush strength, etc.

 

 

 

Plastic recycling code trivia

 

http://www.export911.com/envi/plasCode.htm

 

Interstate Highway 'Numbering Schema' trivia

 

fyi ... from the web site below.    Feel free to come by my map of the United States to confirm this.   Now you can rest easy knowing why the BQE is called 278, LIE 495, and NJ Turnpike is part of 95.

 

http://www.ihoz.com/basic.html

 

“The Interstate Highway System generally follows a couple of simple rules. For two digit roads, east/west roads have even numbers, and north/south roads have odd numbers. The n/s routes start out west with I-5 and increase in value until you get out to I-97 in Maryland. The lowest even number Interstate is I-4 in Florida; as you go north you can go up to I-96 across Michigan. The one other rule is that roads divisible by 5- 5, 10, 15, 20, etc. tend to be the major roads that cross most, if not all, of the country.

Seems pretty simple so far right? Well we then get to the exciting issue of the 3 digit Interstates. Most Interstates have children when they reach major cities. If the baby Interstate goes through the city or all the way around the city, then it will start with an even number. If it stops somewhere in the city, then it gets an odd number. For example, in Pittsburgh I-279 loops from I-79 into the city and then reconnects with it further north. In contrast, I-376 leaves I-76 to go into Pittsburgh and ends downtown. In principle this shouldn't be that big of a deal, but in practice it is frequently debatable as to whether the first number should be even or odd. Some highly questionable choices have been made, which annoys a lot of us road geeks (and don't even get us started on I-238).”

 

NYC subway voice trivia and psychology

 

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0ICQ/is_2002_Dec_2/ai_95643859
Canadian coins same size as American


http://archives.stupidquestion.net/sq61099coins.html

 

Houston St. pronunciation

 

Pronounced “howston” not like the city of Houston.    Who is it named after?

 

 

 

 



Word To HTML Converter